Send his father home

Fundraiser by Casey

This fundraiser supports University of Alabama EMBA for TNKR

$600 raised

About This Fundraiser

On October 20, 2018, TNKR will be holding a birthday fundraiser for Hwang In-Cheol, a South Korean man whose father was abducted to North Korea in 1969. Our organization has been standing with Mr. Hwang for the past two years. The younger Hwang will be having another birthday on October 21 without his father being able to celebrate with him. We hope you will make a donation to help Mr. Hwang as he continues his campaign to have his father released from North Korea.

The Korea Times
From Hwang Solo to Team Hwang
by Casey Lartigue Jr.
June 28, 2016

On December 11, 1969, a North Korean agent hijacked domestic flight Korean Air NAMC YS-11 from Gangwon to Gimpo just 10 minutes after take-off at 12:25 pm. All 50 people on board (46 passengers and 4 crew members) were abducted by North Korea.

The North Korean government eventually released 39 people, but held the other 11. One of those kidnapped is Hwang Won, then a producer with MBC. For about 15 years, his son, Hwang In-Cheol, has been asking the North Korean regime to return his father, doing a balancing act of raising awareness and pressure, without unnecessarily provoking the regime, and keeping it a non-political purely humanitarian effort.

It is not often that we get to collaborate with people who are connected to historical events, but on March 20 of this year, I met In-Cheol at the International Volunteers Workshop. An organization I founded with my South Korean partner, Teach North Korean Refugees (TNKR), is an NGO focusing on North Korean refugees, but we also allow South Koreans in as learners if they help North Korean refugees or can demonstrate a special relationship with North Korea. We invited In-Cheol to join TNKR as a student studying with volunteer English tutors so he can prepare to share his message in English and to join our special project addressing North Korean related issues so he could build a team of volunteers to help him with his cause.

For 15 years, In-Cheol has been holding one-man demonstrations, occasionally working with international and domestic NGOs and governments in his attempt to have his father returned from North Korea. He hit a low point when he lost money, and has had family members try to convince him to give up.

He has refused to let the father he barely knew be forgotten by the world. On June 17, he led a rally at Imjingak's Freedom Bridge (near the DMZ) along with 15 volunteers from TNKR and family members.

Based on pure numbers, the rally would be considered a failure, with only 15 of us participating. To In-Cheol, after doing this on his own for 15 years, it looked like an army a million-strong had joined him. So many people talk about saving the world, but they can't even help one individual. Many don't realize that their presence at events and small donations can help a cause and lift the spirits of those involved.

The most unlikely attendee at the rally: Cecilia. She was just a few months old and her brother In-Cheol was two years old when their father was taken from them by North Korea. She says that she had given up, trying for years to convince her brother and mother to move on with their lives. She now lives in the UK, she returned to South Korea last week to see their ailing mother, to observe the rally, and to see if she could really trust the people who have joined her brother's cause.

On April 13, when we started collaborating with her brother, I posted a photo on Facebook. She was shocked: Her brother had a big grin on his face. She informed me a few days ago that she had not seen him smile in years, that she had hated seeing photos from his one-man demonstrations. Over the last few months, she has seen volunteers from Germany, South Korea, Switzerland, France, the USA and even North Korea join him, in happy group photos as we planned the rally and other activities.

At the June 17 rally, when I met Cecilia for the first time, she told me that it felt like a dream. I pinched one of our interns, then said, "Nope, this is not a dream." She thanked us for giving a voice to him. She admits that she had tried to hide from the kidnapping. With a team of international volunteers, she said, "I feel like I have hands, arms, legs, a voice. The little weak girl could stand up."

The news media occasionally stumbles upon their story, driving by to take snapshots, then driving on to the next story and rarely looking back. The family has been in pain for 47 years, marking anniversaries and living successes and failures without Hwang Won.

The biggest compliment Cecilia gave to me as we talked a few days after the rally: "You are the person who makes invisible people visible. You listen to people, find out what they need, and try to find people who can help them so their voices can be heard. I finally feel that I have the power for my voice to be heard."

We hope we can continue to make their voices heard, that others will sign the online petition and join us this December to mark the 47th anniversary of KAL NAMC YS-11 being hijacked on December 11, 1969.

***

Casey Lartigue Jr. is the co-founder of Teach North Korean Refugees (TNKR) in Seoul.

***

TBS eFM report on the June 17 rally.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3LOXV0IdOyw&list=PLn7xtnmarHFo0ddUJrmXFFN6Wd2VyrL9I&index=57

Recent Supporters

About University of Alabama EMBA for TNKR

Welcome to the University of Alabama Executive MBA fundraiser for Teaching North Korean Refugees (TNKR)! We’d like to thank you for visiting and tell you a little bit about why we are here.

During our international immersion we were introduced to two young ladies that escaped from North Korea. Listening to their stories was a very powerful and moving experience for all of us. On the lighthearted side we were told tales of them watching American movies in secret (Home Alone and Charlie’s Angels). They also told us, as you might expect, about the hardships they faced in North Korea and what it was like growing up in a country where their education system lied to them daily.

However, what really surprised us was when they told us about the difficulties and the traumas they have encountered after they escaped. While getting out of North Korea was good, we were unable to imagine the difficulties they experienced after… We don’t want to go into their personal details, but it involved indentured servitude, physical and emotional trauma. No eyes were left dry.

Thankfully, these ladies and many others have since connected with TNKR. In a very short amount of time, TNKR taught them English as well as many other life skills needed to survive in the free world. TNKR works and gives tirelessly so the refugees can make new lives with their freedom; a freedom that many of us were blessed with at birth.

Please open your hearts and your wallets to support TNKR as they continue helping North Korean refugees!

We also have an exciting announcement! All funds that are donated will be matched by a private donor!

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